Tag: Kale

Weekend Finds 10:5:13

I’m writing this weekend finds post from my mother’s living room in Seattle, where she has been surprised for her birthday by myself, Jonah, and my older sister (yesterday at about 5) and then again by her mother, sister, brother-in-law, brother, and sister-in-law. I love seeing the absolute joy on her face when she is surrounded by her family. Her boyfriend really pulled off an incredible surprise. How fun.

Now let’s get to the finds!

1. Pok Pok Wings

Weekend Finds // Serious Crust by Annie Fassler
Pok Pok’s Famous wings with Uncle Ike

The time has come. The recipe for the chicken wings that launched a thousand ships has finally been released, as part of the publicity for Pok Pok’s new cookbook. It certainly seems like a bit of work, but man oh man, if they taste anything like the original, it’s so worth it. And hey, I’m lucky enough to live in Portland, so if it’s too hard, I’ll just drive across town and pay to have someone else make them for me.

2. It’s Pumpkin Time

Weekend Finds // Serious Crust by Annie Fassler
Curried Coconut Pumpkin Soup

It’s officially October, which means we can officially start obsessing over everything pumpkin. While some people love their pumpkin spice lattes, I am a bigger fan of pumpkin bread, pumpkin soup, and maybe if I get really ambitious, this pumpkin cheesecake.

3. Holiday cocktails

Weekend Finds // Serious Crust by Annie Fassler
Pisco Apple Sour

Maybe you’re a member of one of those families that all gets together and doesn’t drink at all. I am not a member of one of those families. My family likes their wine. And their cocktails. And occasionally their beer, too. And the holiday themed cocktails are starting to appear. This pisco apple sour and this apple pie cocktail with cinnamon meringue look like a perfect place to start.

4. How to Fry an Egg

Weekend Finds // Serious Crust by Annie Fassler
How to fry an egg!

No, it’s not the title of a chapter from How to Cook a Wolf or An Everlasting Meal. This egg frying tip is seriously about to change lives. When you crack your egg into your pan, add a bit of water and a lid – the water will steam the top of the white that’s over the yolk that never gets cooked otherwise. It’s a perfect solution to a serious problem.

5. Miso-creamed Kale

Weekend Finds // Serious Crust by Annie Fassler
Miso Creamed Kale

A friend of mine recommended this miso-creamed kale recipe from the now shuttered Wafu, a ramen restaurant in Portland. While I wasn’t crazy about their ramen, I was crazy about their small plates. This dish looks delicious and fairly easy to make.

Stale Bread Soup (Ribollita)

Stale Bread Soup // Serious Crust by Annie FasslerStale Bread Soup // Serious Crust by Annie Fassler

I realize that at this point you might be sick and tired of hearing us harp about how great Tamar Adler’s An Everlasting Meal is. But hear me out one more time. Everyone has stale bread. Or at least everyone who has bread at some point and does not eat it all eventually has stale bread lying around. And most of the time it gets thrown away, or responsibly composted. If you are culinarily educated, dear reader, you may already have known of stale bread soup; but as I read Tamar’s book, I was astounded to find out that not only does such a thing exist, but there is a long and ancient tradition of creating soup from leftover bread (Ribollita in Italian).

There are a few things that should be said about stale bread soup. First, it is not a soup in the same way that chicken noodle is a soup; stale bread soup is usually much thicker and feels more like a hearty chili. Second, stale bread soup is more of a general idea and a starting point than a recipe. It is meant to be made with whatever is around, provided you have some stale bread (otherwise, you will be making whatever-is-around soup – which could turn out to be vegetables-in-water “soup” if you don’t have any broth lying around).

The recipe below is adapted slightly from Tamar’s recipe for Ribollita in An Everlasting Meal. In usual Tamar fashion, you will use A LOT of olive oil in this recipe. We have made stale bread soup twice now, so I’ve noted the different things we used.

Stale Bread Soup (Ribollita)

Ingredients

Olive oil
1 onion, diced
2 cloves garlic
Celery, if you have it (I did not)
salt
1/2 cup chopped fresh herbs like parsley or rosemary or thyme (if you don’t have fresh, maybe do 1/4 cup dried?)
1/2 teaspoon chile flakes
Tomatoes in some form, if you want (3 peeled fresh tomatoes, or I used 1 can diced. Made it once without tomatoes as well)
1 bunch leafy greens (I used kale once and cauliflower greens once; other ideas are swiss chard, collard greens, radish greens, etc)
1/4 cup water
2 cups cooked beans (I used a can of black beans both times, Tamar suggests chickpeas or cannellini beans)
2 cups broth from beans or chicken/veggie stock or cans of tomatoes (I used a combo of all three, and you can make up any shortfall with water)
1 piece of Parmesan rind (Do this if you can, because it makes the soup soooo tasty and rich. Also, what else are you going to do with your Parmesan rind?)
2 cups stale bread, crusts removed, torn/cut into 1/2-inch pieces

Instructions

Heat 1/4 inch olive oil (this is just the beginning) in a big-ish soup pot. Cook the onion and garlic (and celery if you have it) until they soften. Add the herbs and chile flakes and a little bit of salt. Add the tomatoes and cook for a few minutes over medium heat.

Chop the greens (and remove from the stems) then add to the pot, and add the water. Cover and cook over low heat until the greens are wilted. Put in all your broths/waters/juices and the beans, plus the Parmesan rind.

(If you have a bunch of Parmesan left, make sure to cut the rind from the rest of the Parmesan. Otherwise, just save the Parmesan rind for when you will next make bread soup. Make sure your Parmesan is big enough that you can keep track of it, because you’re going to take it out later.)

Bring to a simmer, then add the bread and more olive oil (Tamar says to add 1/2 cup, but I was not brave enough and probably added about a 1/4 cup at this point). Cover and cook for 1/2 hour on low, stirring occasionally to make sure the bottom doesn’t burn. The bread will soak up the soup and then liquify into it.  Taste it, add more broth or salt or whatever you want, and then take it off the heat.

Add in another 1/2 cup olive oil (Tamar, are you crazy!?!? I probably added 3 tablespoons here) and take out the Parmesan rind. You can grate Parmesan on top and add some pepper to serve.

This soup is perfect for a windy, rainy, cold, or dark winter/fall night.

Kale, Squash, and a Runny Yolk

Kale, squash, and a runny yolk

Sometimes you just need an easy dinner. You need to comb through your fridge, scrounge what ingredients you can, and stand there, for a minute, gazing at your collection, trying to figure out what you can make with all of this. It doesn’t have to be fancy, or even graceful, but tasting good and mildly cohesive would be nice. You’ve got a bunch of kale that you really should use soon, a small, friendly looking butternut squash, and a jalapeño. And eggs. Luckily, the roommates always keep lots of eggs around. And do you know what brings a dish together with ease? A runny yolk.

So you slice up the butternut squash, drizzle with olive oil and salt, mix in some chopped garlic, and lay it out on a baking sheet, laying a couple rosemary springs atop it all, sliding it into the oven to roast. You sautée up the kale with more oil, salt, and garlic, and even some jalapeño. And then, to finish it all off, you soft boil a couple of eggs (one for you and one for the tall fellow you eat dinner with). Simple as that, you have dinner.

Kale, Squash, and a Soft Boiled Egg

Ingredients

A small butternut squash, olive oil, and salt (and anything you’d like to roast with it)
1 bunch of kale, garlic, olive oil, and salt
Eggs

Instructions

Peel and cube or slice the butternut squash into whatever shapes you like to eat. Slide into the oven at about 375 and roast until easily pierced with a fork. Sautée kale with a tsp of olive oil, chopped garlic, and a sprinkling of salt. If you want the kale to steam and wilt a little more, you can add some water to the pan (no more than 1/4 cup) and cover with a lid. After letting the kale steam for a bit, remove the lid and let the water cook off.

To soft boil the eggs, bring a pot of water to a boil. Drop the eggs in, allow to cook for 6 minutes (this can be adjusted depending on how you like your eggs). After 6 minutes, remove the eggs with a slotted spoon, run under cold water, and peel.

Put your egg on top of your kale and squash to let the yolk run over the veggies a bit. It adds a nice rich creaminess. Enjoy.